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1,000 Lanterns Released In Mosul To Celebrate Assyrian New Year

Written By Associated Press Television News | Mumbai | Published:

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  • One-thousand lanterns were lit and released at Mosul's Gates of Nineveh on Saturday night to mark the start of the Assyrian New Year.
  • The festival has its roots in the traditional religious practices of Mesopotamia before the adoption of Christianity after the 1st century AD.

One-thousand lanterns were lit and released at Mosul's Gates of Nineveh on Saturday night to mark the start of the Assyrian New Year.

The festival has its roots in the traditional religious practices of Mesopotamia before the adoption of Christianity after the 1st century AD.

Year zero for the Assyrian people is set at 4750 BC, but this was fixed in the modern era with a view to tying the story of modern Assyrians to the ancient peoples of Mesopotamia.

That makes this year the 6,768th Assyrian New Year.

Modern Assyrians mainly live in Iraq and Syria, though in recent decades many have emigrated to the West.

Many used to live in Mosul but they fled when the Islamic State group occupied the city in 2014.

Communities still inhabit the towns and villages of the Nineveh plains and the Kurdish region.

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