'His Personal Decision': Army On Controversy Over MS Dhoni's 'Balidan' Gloves

General News

The Indian Army on Saturday distanced itself from the controversy surrounding the daggar insignia on Indian cricketer Mahendra Singh Dhoni's gloves.

Written By Press Trust Of India | Mumbai | Updated On:

The Indian Army on Saturday distanced itself from the controversy surrounding the daggar insignia on Indian cricketer Mahendra Singh Dhoni's gloves, saying it had nothing to do with it. Dhoni's gloves sported the Balidan badge of the parachute regiment's special force during India's opening world cup match against South Africa in Southampton in England on May 5.

Talking to reporters after a passing-out parade at the Indian Military Academy here, GOC-in-C (South-Western Command) Lt Gen Cherish Matheson said it was Dhoni's personal decision to wear the Army insignia on his gloves and the Army had nothing to do with it.

WATCH: Virat Kohli Maintains Silence Over Questions On ICC's Objection To The 'Balidaan Badge' MS Dhoni's Gloves

The International Cricket Council (ICC) alone could take a decision on the issue, he said.

Being an honorary lieutenant colonel of the regiment, the insignia is embossed on Dhoni's gloves.

When the ICC objected to it, the BCCI had sought permission for it, which was turned down by the world cricketing body. The ICC said players could wear logos of sponsors only.

Read: 'I Have No Idea', Says Rohit Sharma Amid ICC Objection To 'Baalidan Badge' On MS Dhoni's Gloves

Earlier, men in Blue's vice-captain Rohit Sharma spoke on the ongoing controversy on MS Dhoni's gloves with army insignia imprinted on it. In a pre-match press conference on Saturday, Sharma chose to say that he has no idea about it. 

"I am not the captain, I have no idea about Dhoni's glove. Probably you can see it tomorrow," Sharma said.

This is the first response by the team set to face the Australian team in the ongoing ICC World Cup 2019. Earlier, Captain Virat Kohli was asked about the controversy by the reporters in London but he chose to stay tight-lipped about it. 

Published:
By 2030, 40% Indians will not have access to drinking water
SAVE WATER NOW
PEOPLE HAVE PLEDGED SO FAR
DO NOT MISS