Prakash Raj On Sabarimala Issue: Any Religion Which Asks A Woman Not To Worship Is Not A Religion To Me

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Prakash openly said if a religion prohibits women from worshipping a certain deity, then it is not the right faith for him. Here's what he exactly said, "Any religion which asks women not to worship is not a religion to me. Any God who does not want my mother to worship is not God to me." 

Written By Digital Desk | Mumbai | Updated On:

Prakash Raj has always been one actor who other than his performances, has been rather vocal about his political opinions. He has often questioned the current regime on many hot-button issues and has stirred up the hornet's nest multiple times. At the moment, the big raging debate in the country is on the Sabarimala temple and how in spite of Supreme Court's orders, devotees continue to protest against the verdict. Now, the actor has released a statement on the same and it will not please the devotees. Prakash openly said if a religion prohibits women from worshipping a certain deity, then it is not the right faith for him. Here's what he exactly said, "Any religion which asks women not to worship is not a religion to me. Any God who does not want my mother to worship is not God to me." 

Read | BJP Protests In Kerala Over Recovery Of Sabarimala Pilgrim's Body

Giving an elaborate explanation on the issue, he said, "If every one of us believes that we were given birth women and if you call the Earth as Mother Earth if she wants to worship, let her do it. Or you take her to do it. Any religion which asks a woman, my mother, to worship is not a religion to me. Any bhakt, who will stop my mother from worshipping is not a bhakt to me and any God who doesn't want my mother to worship him is not God to me." 

Read | #MeToo: Sruthi Hariharan Gets Support From Prakash Raj, Shraddha Srinath After Accusing Arjun Sarja Of Sexual Harassment

Although his fiery and passionate speech was met with applause, one can rest assured that he will face heavy retaliation for his views on the matter. The Sabarimala row became an issue of national importance after Supreme Court finally passed a verdict allowing women from the ages of ten to fifty to enter the temple premises and worship, which had not been the case for the longest time. However, the devotees of the temple did not accept this verdict, leading to protests and clashes with the local police. 

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