Muttiah Muralitharan Wades Into World Cup Final Debate On Both Controversies, Disagrees With How Things Turned Out In England-New Zealand Thriller

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Sri Lanka's spin legend Muttiah Muralitharan has shared his opinion on the still raging controversy over the World Cup final where England emerged winners over New Zealand despite the two sides being inseparable on runs over 100 overs, and also in the super over.

Written By Digital Desk | Mumbai | Updated On:

Sri Lanka's spin legend Muttiah Muralitharan has shared his opinion on the still raging controversy over the World Cup final where England emerged winners over New Zealand despite the two sides being inseparable on runs over 100 overs, and also in the super over.

"They should have been joint champions because that would have been reflective of the real battle between both teams," Murali said, while speaking to Cricinfo.

"Both teams did well, and at the end of the day, nobody got the winning run!" he pointed out.

Buttressing his argument further, the 1996 World Cup-winner who is also the highest wicket-taker in ODI and Test Cricket, said, "See, you should consider who is the best on the day, but you couldn't split it out because both were better, so what can you do?"

He also entered the debate over the rules of the game, particularly the two that affected New Zealand so badly. About the controversial boundaries rule - where the number of boundaries scored by both sides was used to pick a winner when they ended all-square on runs - he said:

"You'd have to see if there's some other way to get the result. At the end of the day at this World Cup final, no-one scored a winning run... that's what people expect. So maybe a few changes might happen."

On the matter of the key 6-run overthrow where the ball cannoned off England batsman Ben Stokes' bat while he was completing a run, and went to the boundary, Muralitharan said, "maybe the unfortunate incident where the ball ricocheted off the bat and went for four, that law should be changed - maybe dead ball or something."

As for when such changes may happen, Muralitharan opined, "It might be that happens in a few years, because everyone has to experience the thing, and then seek out the solutions."

England won their first World Cup on Sunday, while the Kiwis were disappointed to have been deemed to have come up short in their second consecutive final.

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