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World Cup Champion Yuvraj Singh Reveals The Details About The 'worst Day In His Career'. Here's What He Said

Written By Radhika Sarkar | Mumbai | Published:

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  • One of world cricket's iconic players and a stalwart of Team India Yuvraj Singh announced his retirement from International Cricket on Monday.

One of world cricket's iconic players and a stalwart of Team India Yuvraj Singh announced his retirement from International Cricket on Monday. He made this major announcement at a press conference in Mumbai. Yuvi thereby, brought curtains down on his 19-year illustrious career where he was a part of India's two World title triumphs (ICC World T20 in 2007 and ICC Cricket World Cup in 2011). He was adjudged 'Player of the Tournament' in the 2011 World Cup.

 WATCH: World Cup Champion Yuvraj Singh Announces His Retirement In Emotional Press Conference. Full Briefing Here

While addressing the media at the press conference, the 37-year-old opened up about the 'worst day in his career', and said, "It was the 2014 T20 World Cup finals in Sri-Lanka when I scored 11 out of 21 balls. It was so shattering that I felt like my career was over and at the time I was written off to an extent by everyone that made me feel that it was all over. Then I took a bit of time and realised why I play cricket and that is because I love the game". 

Further elaborating on the narrative, he said, "I went back to the basics and scored heavily in domestic Cricket and a year and a half later, I made my comeback for T20 in India where I hot the last six and four against Australia in Sydney and suddenly all my belief came right back and after scoring 700 runs in five games in domestic Cricket, I finally made my comeback". 

READ: 'One Of The Greatest Match-winners In The History Of The Game': Mohammad Kaif's Heartfelt Message On Yuvraj Singh's Retirement Can't Be Missed

Yuvraj played 40 Tests, 304 ODIs and 58 T20Is for India. He put together 1900 runs in the longest format, and 8701 in the one-dayers, the format in which he enjoyed most success. "It was a love-hate relationship with this game. I can't explain what it really means to me. This game taught me to fight. I have failed more times than I succeeded and I will never give up," he said. 

The attacking left-hander listed the 2011 World Cup triumph, being man of the match in the event's final, getting six sixes in an over against England in the same tournament and his first Test hundred, against Pakistan in Lahore in 2004, as the three most special moments of his career.

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