CES Aims To Offer A Glimpse Of The Future Of TV In 2020

Gadgets

In the era of new, emerging technologies that spread like wildfire, it's an absolutely human-like tendance to wonder what will be watching TV like in the 2020s.

Written By Tech Desk | Mumbai | Updated On:
CES

In the era of new, emerging technologiesb that's changing at a breakneck speed, it's absolutely valid to wonder what it'll be like watching TV in 2020. The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) tech show in Las Vegas aims to offer some answers, and believe it or not, most of the answers boil down to more streaming, effectively more efforts to glue you to your phone. So do television sets (no matter how modern and trendy in design) have any future? Enter CES 2020!

Once upon a time, if you recall, the CES was dominated by computer and chip makers and all smartphones and accessories were mostly reserved for the Mobile World Congress (MWC). But times have changed. This year, TV networks and streaming services (both old and new) are participating in the CES in not-so-bad numbers, and Lest we forget, NBC Universal and WarnerMedia prepare to join the clash with Netflix later this year.

Some companies also promise a big new push into “bite-sized” video designed to draw mobile viewers from YouTube, despite the fact that a similar effort several years ago foundered.

CES has hosted previous attempts to set out a road map for TV. At the 2015 show, satellite TV company Dish announced a cheaper, cable-like package of TV channels delivered over the internet and intended for cord-cutters . Offerings from Sony, DirecTV, Google, Hulu and others soon joined Dish’s Sling TV. But five years later, these online alternatives have been struggling, raising prices and in the case of Sony’s PlayStation Vue, shutting down altogether.

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As television companies experiment with making more shows available in more ways, they’ll also accumulate data on viewing habits far beyond what they got with over-the-air and cable channels. That will help them target advertising to viewers’ interests and make recommendations for other shows to keep viewers glued.

Owners of television channels and producers of their shows are selling Netflix-like subscription services directly to consumers. Disney Plus launched in November, while WarnerMedia’s HBO Max and NBCUniversal’s Peacock are coming in a few months. But they face competition from tech companies also seeking to replicate Netflix’s success. Apple launched its own streaming service in November, while Quibi promises phone-friendly viewing.

“Bets have been made and billions of dollars have been spent on content,” said Peter Csathy , founder and chairman of digital media consulting firm CreaTV Media. “Those numbers will only go up as all these Goliaths and then the new guys coming on board are all looking for ways to break out.”

As television companies experiment with making more shows available in more ways, they’ll also accumulate data on viewing habits far beyond what they got with over-the-air and cable channels. That will help them target advertising to viewers’ interests and make recommendations for other shows to keep viewers glued.

Stay tuned for announcements from CES 2020!

(With inputs from AP)

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