Science

Black Hole Mystery Solved After 40 Years, Scientists Uncover The Most Comprehensive Simulation Ever

Written By Tech Desk | Mumbai | Published:

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  • Scientists have uncovered the most comprehensive simulation of a black hole till the date
  • With the efforts, scientists have solved a mystery dating back more than 40 years over how black holes consume matter

Scientists have uncovered the most comprehensive simulation of a black hole till the date. With the efforts, scientists have solved a mystery dating back more than 40 years over how black holes consume matter. Thanks to the latest findings around the first ever black hole photographed earlier, astrophysicists are now inching closer to understanding how black holes form and develop.

So, how are black holes born?

Black holes are born out of giant stars that fail to withstand the compressing force of their own gravity and ultimately collapse in on themselves. Eventually, black holes become incredibly dense objects with a strong, powerful gravitational pull that nothing may escape them.

As black holes consume more of gas, dust and space debris, they take a form and increasingly develop into a gigantic accretion disk, which was a blurry halo around first ever image of the black hole released in April from the Event Horizon Telescope.

READ | First ever black hole image: How it was captured and everything else you need to know

However, accretion disks are almost invariably bent at an end to the introduction of the black hole, identified as its equatorial plane.

In 1975, Nobel Prize-winning physicist John Bardeen and astrophysicist Jacobus Petterson hypothesised that a rotating black hole would let the inner precinct of a tilted accretion disk to line up with the black hole's equatorial plane. But no model could demonstrate ever how. However, it changes going forward.

Astrophysicists from Northwestern University, Oxford University and the University of Amsterdam, used large sets of data using Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) and simulate how black holes interact with their accretion disks.

READ | This computer scientist developed algorithm to help astronomers produce first black hole image three years ago

Their strategy provided them with the computing power to estimate magnetic turbulence, which befalls when several particles churn at different speeds within the accretion disk. It is specifically this electromagnetic force that makes matter come to the centre of the black hole.

In 2016, an MIT graduate student in electrical engineering and computer science Katie Bouman led the development of the new algorithm that helped astronomers product the first image of a black hole. The image if the black hole was subsequently released in April.

(With agency inputs)

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