Science

IN PICTURES: World Experiences 2019's Only 'Total Solar Eclipse' Lasting 4 Mins 33 Seconds Long

Written By Suchitra Karthikeyan | Mumbai | Published:

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  • In a rare astronomical event, the world witnessed 2019's only total solar eclipse on Tuesday night and was visible i parts of Chile and Argentina
  • The cosmic event which began at  10.25 IST according to  NASA lasted for an estimated 4 minutes 33 seconds long
  • The Earth’s next total solar eclipse will be 14 December 2020, and it also will cross Chile and Argentina

In a rare astronomical event, the world witnessed 2019's only total solar eclipse on Tuesday night. While the total solar eclipse was not visible from India, it was viewed clearly in parts of northern Chile and Argentina, as shared by the astronomers at the European Space Agency (ESA) which was live streaming the event from the Chile Observatory.

The cosmic event which began at  10.25 IST according to  NASA, swept along a path covering 11,000 km across open waters to Chile and Argentina and lasted for an estimated 4 minutes 33 seconds long. This was the first total solar eclipse since August 2017, when the moon passed between Earth and the sun over parts of the United States, as shared by NASA. 

Here are some of the first photos of the event shared by AFP:

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ESA also shared the precise moment of the moon's shadow cast across the earth as it passed the Pacific Ocean moving towards South America.

Here is the totality of the eclipse captured by ESA.

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What is a Total Solar Eclipse?

While there are four types of solar eclipses - partial, annular, total and hybrid, the rarest among them is the 'Total Solar Eclipse' which occur once a year. This phenomenon happens when the moon passes between the sun and the Earth completely blocking the view of the sun from Earth. During a total eclipse, the sun's crown, or corona which is the sun's outer atmosphere is visible to the naked eye. 

According to NASA, while partial eclipses are expected at least twice a year, a total eclipse occurs somewhere on Earth about every year and a half. The Earth’s next total solar eclipse will be 14 December 2020, and it also will cross Chile and Argentina, though on a different path.
 

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