Delete Facebook: WhatsApp Co-founder Brian Acton Slams Social Media Giant, Yet Again

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Brian Acton, one of two co-founders of WhatsApp, is very upset with Facebook, the same company that made him a billionaire after acquiring WhatsApp for $19 billion in 2014.

Written By Tanmay Patange | Mumbai | Updated On:

Brian Acton, one of the two co-founders of WhatsApp, is very upset with Facebook, the same company that made him a billionaire after acquiring WhatsApp for $19 billion in 2014. Last year, Acton tweeted "It is time. #DeleteFacebook" in the aftermath of Facebook-Cambridge Analytica data scandal that came as a bombshell. But Acton did not stop there. He has once again urged people to get rid of a Facebook account while addressing students.

Currently, Acton is heading Signal, a non-profit rival of WhatsApp. Acton slammed Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg for the company's privacy woes and making a business out of it. Acton has called for people to delete not only Facebook but also the entire family of apps including Instagram, WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger. Acton has been openly critical of Facebook ever since Cambridge Analaytica happened.

In 2017, Acton left Facebook. But within months after his departure, Acton described his disagreements with Zuckerberg over how to make WhatsApp profitable.

2018's Cambridge Analytica data scandal was enough to shook Facebook to its foundation. It saw the data of 87 million users improperly accessed and misused to meddle with 2016 U.S. presidential elections. Facebook is in the middle of multiple lawsuits and inquiries over its privacy and data-protection practices, courtesy of Cambridge Analytica scandal.

READ | Here's how Cambridge Analytica accessed data of more than half a million Indians through Facebook

While defending his decision to sell WhatsApp, here is what Acton had to say:

"I had 50 employees, and I had to think about them and the money they would make from this sale. I had to think about our investors and I had to think about my minority stake. I didn't have the full clout to say no if I wanted to."

In December, The New York Times made some explosive revelations about Facebook’s partnership with other companies to allow companies like Netflix, Spotify and the Royal Bank of Canada access to users' private messages.

The report emerged as a result of documents and interviews with former Facebook employees and its corporate partners, alleging that Facebook let certain companies access users’ data despite a level of protection in place to prevent that from happening in the first place on a user’s end.

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