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Birds Explore Landmarks, Streets In Paris As Humans Stay Home Amid Lockdown

Allain Bougrain-Dubourg, head of the French League for the Protection of Birds, was quoted saying that the birds in the city of Paris had turned wanderers.

Birds

With the coronavirus lockdown, no human movement, and rare traffic in the French capital, the birds have reportedly ventured out to explore the quietude, waddling across the four-lane highways in Paris, according to ornithologists. Many, perched on the plinth of a statue in front of Paris's Musee D'Orsay have emboldened to come out of their regular habitat and roam around in the city, according to media reports. 

Allain Bougrain-Dubourg, head of the French League for the Protection of Birds, was quoted saying to a news agency that the birds in the city of Paris had turned into wanderers and enthusiastic explorers. The French government's strict home confinement measures left vast cities abandoned for nature to thrive. He further added that birds were curious in nature and explored the vacant roads wondering if they were going to find food, a satisfactory spot, or some serenity. France, as of April 23, entered its sixth week of the lockdown to combat the deadly coronavirus pandemic. 

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Reduced noise pollution

The markets shuttered, reportedly reduced the usual buzz in the traffic-clogged city, hence this created a favourable environment for the bird species to meander on some of Paris’ otherwise busiest thoroughfares, as per news agency report. Some of the flocking might be attributed to the reduction in the noise pollution level, and the birds no longer had to struggle against the street hustle-bustle to sing a mating song. A tidal islet, Mont Saint-Michel, located on France's northwest coast which would normally be abuzz with tourists, has observed silence since weeks with the customary birds fluttering in the area. 

Sister Eve-Marie, a nun with the Monastic Fraternities of Jerusalem, who inhibits the islet told the news agency that birds, little, and all sizes that had remained hidden for several years were showing themselves now as there weren’t any humans. This wasn’t the case earlier when they’d be scared, she added. 

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(Image Credit: AP)

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