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COVID-19: Pfizer Unsure About Length Of Its Booster Protection Against Omicron, Says CEO

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla stated that it is uncertain how long a booster dose will keep people safe from COVID-19.

Pfizer

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First detected in South Africa, the Omicron variant has made an enormous impact worldwide as COVID cases are increasing. Authorities have advised people to get vaccinated and booster shots to combat the virus. However, as per the reports of CNBC, Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla stated that two doses of the company's vaccine may not give adequate protection against infection by the Omicron variant of COVID-19 and that the initial shots have lost some of their efficacy in avoiding hospitalisation.

Bourla stressed the significance of booster shot to increase the protection of people against Omicron, according to CNBC. He stated that for Omicron, the two doses aren't enough and that the current vaccine's third dose offers reasonable protection against hospitalisations and good protection against deaths.

Uncertain how long a booster dose will keep people safe

Although the booster dose protects people from Omicron, he stated that it is uncertain how long a booster dose will keep people safe from COVID-19. Omicron is highly contagious than prior variants, and it can get through some of the protection afforded by Pfizer's vaccines.

UK Health Security Agency suggests that two vaccine doses are 52% effective in preventing hospitalisation 25 weeks following the second shot. According to CNBC, the statistics from the United Kingdom says that two doses of Pfizer or Moderna vaccines are only approximately 10% effective in preventing omicron infection 20 weeks after the second dose. A booster dose can prevent symptomatic infection by up to 75% and hospitalisation by up to 88% but for can protect for how long is uncertain. Boosters are only 40% to 50% effective against infection ten weeks after having a shot.

People with compromised immune systems should get four shots

According to CNBC, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDS) stated that some people with compromised immune systems should now get four shots, three primary doses, and one booster. Pfizer dosages for those over 60 have now been made available in Israel. Bourla also announced that Pfizer would have an omicron-specific vaccine ready in March. He suggests that more testing is needed to see if fourth dosages are required.

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