Egypt Ministry Discovers Rare Bust Of Statue Of Pharaoh Ramses II Near Giza

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The Egyptian Antiquities Ministry announced on Wednesday that the bust of a statue of the pharaoh Ramses II has been discovered near Giza, south of Cairo.

Written By Riya Baibhawi | Mumbai | Updated On:
Egypt Ministry discovers a rare bust of statue of Pharaoh Ramses II near Giza

The Egyptian Antiquities Ministry announced on Wednesday that the bust of a statue of the pharaoh Ramses II has been discovered near Giza, south of Cairo. This statue of the pharaoh measures 105 cm in height and 55cm in width. The Egyptian ministry has termed it as “Rare”. 

Has the 'Ka' symbol on it

According to a statement from the ministry, the excavation was conducted last week by a ministry team on private land in Mit Rahina near the site of the ancient city of Memphis located around 30km south of Cairo. This statue is the first rose granite bust of Ramses II found that has the ‘Ka’ symbol on it. In ancient Egypt, Ka represented the spirit of a human or God that could reside in a statue of the person or deity after death.

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Ramses II known as Ozymandias in Greek sources has often been regarded as the greatest, most celebrated and most powerful pharaoh of the19th dynasty (1301- 1236 BC). He was called Great Ancestor by the later Egyptians. Last week, three 3,500-year-old painted wooden coffins were found from the ancient city of Luxor, Egypt, by a team of French archaeologists in their latest archaeological discoveries. The coffins were excavated from the necropolis of al-Asasif, on the west bank of the Nile.

The coffins remained in good condition and carried colourful decorations and hieroglyphics. Out of the three, one was feathered style, dating back to the 17th dynasty and the second was from the 18th dynasty. The archaeologists had also discovered two cones made out of wax on the heads of skeletons which dated back to 3,300 years. It was later found that they were real hats made out of wax. Egypt has in recent years has been seeking to promote archaeological discoveries across the country in a bid to revive tourism. The industry was hit hard after the 2011 turmoil in the country.

Read: Three 3,500-year-old Painted Wooden Coffins Discovered In The Egyptian City Of Luxor

Read: Egyptian Government Seeks To Do Away With Popular Tuk-tuks
 

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