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New Zealand: Search Teams Find Body Of Climber Who Went Missing 40 Years Ago

Body of a mountain climber has been dug out from Mount Aspiring, New Zealand 40 years after he went missing, Sky News reported citing a report on March 30.

Image: aleksdahlberg/Unsplash

Body of a mountain climber has been dug out from Mount Aspiring 40 years after he went missing, Sky News reported citing a report on March 30. The adventurer identified as Terry Jordan was 30 years old when he disappeared while scaling the mountain with his companion Marc Weinstein. While a misadventure in December of 1978, resulted in the immediate death of Weinstein, Jordan went missing. 

Backpacks found

Now, two decades later, search and rescue teams belonging to New Zealand’s town of Wanaka found the body. Additionally, they also found two backpacks buried in the vicinity. The police of the area have not yet commented on the discovery but Kiwi media has reported that snow and high winds had hampered the retrieval of the body. It was thought that Jordan, who was from Canberra in Australia, had either fallen down a crevice or been buried in an avalanche, as there was avalanche debris in the area.

Speaking about his friend’s disappearance to the Canberra Times in 1978, Jordan’s friend Fritz Schaumberg had said that both men had been “very good bushwalkers, and very determined, but I think anyone who goes over there to climb should first get some experience with a climbing course”.

While both Jordan and Weinstein were deemed to be good climbers, a lot of other adventurers try to scale mountain peaks without sufficient training or experience. These results in numerous mishaps every year. In a bid to prevent such tragedies, Nepal, last month set an example by banning three Indian mountain climbers for six years after they faked the Mount Everest summit. Issuing a stern warning to other climbers, the Nepali administration revoked the Everest Summit certificates of Narender Singh Yadav and Seema Rani Goswami along with their team leader Naba Kumar Phukon. Both Yadav and Goswami had falsely claimed that they had reached the apex of the world’s highest peak in 2016 and that Nepal’s tourism department had certified their feat.

Image: aleksdahlberg/Unsplash

 


 

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