National Weather Service Issues Alert For Falling Iguanas In Florida

US News

The National Weather Service in Miami on Tuesday issued an unofficial warning for falling iguanas due to the unusual cold snap that recently hit the state.

Written By Riya Baibhawi | Mumbai | Updated On:
National Weather Service

The National Weather Service in Miami on Tuesday issued an unofficial warning for falling iguanas due to the unusual cold snap that recently hit the Sunshine State. The weather services took to Twitter to inform people that they shouldn’t be surprised if they see the reptiles falling from trees at night. 

Should not be presumed dead

The weather service also said that Iguanas are cold-blooded and they slow down become immobile when the temperature drops. They added that they may fall from trees but shouldn’t be presumed dead. According to Chris Michaels, a meteorologist in Virginia, once temperatures reach a certain level, iguanas stiffen up and fall out of trees. While speaking to international media he said, that the sight of falling iguanas was something observed over the years in South Florida.

Read: Effects Of Climate Change Pushing Australia's Platypus Population Towards Extinction

Read: Officials: Police Shoot Man Who Stabbed Miami Beach Officer

Michaels also revealed that blood of Iguanas doesn’t move around quickly when the temperature drops to 40s or lower. This leads to stiffness in Iguana's bodies and they fall down. During a similar cold snap back in 2018, the weather services issued a similar warning which instructed the ciitzens to leave iguanas alone in case they find one. It further added that fallen iguanas may feel threatened and attack people once they warmed up.  Meanwhile, the weather services said that this week’s cold snap could be short-lived as the temperatures are forecast to rebound in the mid-70s in Miami by Thursday. 

Another species that is affected by climate change is Australia's unique platypus which is slowly being pushed towards extinction due to prolonged drought and other effects of climate change as claimed by a recent report. The study shows that the rived dwelling animals have already disappeared from 40 per cent of its original habitat due to drought, land clearing, pollution and building of dams.

Read: UN Rights Panel Finds Climate Change Can Be Cause For Asylum

Read: Chennai: Man Detained With Kangaroo Rats, Red Squirrel And Blue Iguana Lizards

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