Protests Erupt Against Saudi Prince Mohammed Bin Salman's Arrival In Tunisia

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Hundreds of people took to streets in the capital city of Tunisia on Tuesday, November 27 to protest against the arrival of Saudi Arabia Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MSB) in the North African country

Written By Press Trust Of India | Mumbai | Updated On:

Hundreds of people took to streets in the capital city of Tunisia on Tuesday, November 27 to protest against the arrival of Saudi Arabia Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MSB) in the North African country.

The protests were organised in the wake of the alleged involvement of the Saudi Prince in the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi in the kingdom's consulate in Istanbul on October 2.

Al Jazeera reported that for the second day in a row, protestors showed massive demonstrations on streets more than seven years after the revolution which toppled long-time ruler Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali regime and started a new wave of uprisings against the oppressive governments across the Middle East.

"I was here yesterday and I came here again to say 'No' to the murderer and criminal, Mohammed bin Salman," , Al Jazeera quoted Said Arous, a prominent human rights activist, as calling Khashoggi's killing "an appalling crime".

READ: Turkey Searches Villa Of 'Close' Saudi Prince Associate: Reports

The Saudi crown prince arrived in Tunisia on Tuesday, November 27 evening as part of a regional tour, before embarking on his visit to Argentina to attend the G20 summit on Friday [November 30].

Arous said that the Saudi Prince's foreign tour, especially after claims of his involvement in Khashoggi murder, is aimed at whitewashing his image abroad amid an international outcry over the murder of the former Washington Post columnist, Al Jazeera reported.

(All pictures from Associated Press)

The protestors at the same time also accused Saudi Arabia of carrying out a coalition-led military campaign in Yemen, where a four-year war has spawned the world's worst humanitarian crisis. The devastating war in Yemen is believed to have killed tens of thousands of people, including many children especially due to malnutrition and rampant poverty.

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