Last Updated:

Rome Creates Bike Lanes As Part Of Virus Measures

Rome has introduced 150 km (93 miles) of emergency bike lanes to give commuters the chance to travel safely by bike instead of public transport during the coronavirus pandemic.


Rome has introduced 150 km (93 miles) of emergency bike lanes to give commuters the chance to travel safely by bike instead of public transport during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Italian capital was extending its cycling network at a very slow pace before the pandemic - main stations lacked sufficient bike parking and the city had few bike lanes.

Before the pandemic accelerated the development of bike lanes all over the city, the existing lanes were often weren't connected - forcing cyclists to brave busy and dangerous roads.

Rome transport councilor Pietro Calabrese explained the new lanes were transitory and not temporary and they will remain in place after COVID-19 emergency.

According to Calabrese, after the Italian government ruled a partial reopening of various economic activities on May 4 only 15% of Roman commuters returned to traveling by train and bus.

The capital's public transport network is currently only allowing 50% of the original passenger capacity to board in an effort to contain the spread of the coronavirus.

Local residents commonly think that riding a bicycle in Rome is unsafe due to heavy car traffic and lack of bike lanes.

"We are very happy. We have been asking for them (bike lanes) for years," said Enzina Fasano, president of the 'Save the Cyclists' association, "we were simply asking for a sing of civic sense and dignity for cyclists."

According to ISTAT (Italian statistics institute) only a very small percentage of Rome commuters cycle to work, a much lower percentage than in other European cities.

 

First Published:
By 2030, 40% Indians will not have access to drinking water
SAVE WATER NOW
PEOPLE HAVE PLEDGED SO FAR