Venice Floods: Italy To Declare State Of Emergency Amid High Tides

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With Venice flooded by the highest tides since the 1960s, the government of Italy is all set to declare a state of emergency to secure funds to repair the city.

Written By Pragya Puri | Mumbai | Updated On:
Venice

With Venice flooded by the highest tides since the 1960s, the government of Italy is all set to declare a state of emergency to secure funds to repair the historic lagoon city. The water levels will rise further, causing more damage to the historical city, said officials. According to reports, Italy Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte described the flooding as “a blow to the heart of our country,” after spending Wednesday night in the city.

Rising water levels in the historical city 

The local people residing in Venice woke up to the sounds of sirens indicating high water level which exceeded the 130-centimetre limit. This will bring the salty, dirty water back into the city. Mayor of the city, Luigi Brugnaro took to Twitter and wrote that the entire city is on its knees. He further added that the historical monument of St. Basilica was struck hard by the floods and sustained serious damages. 

Reportedly, the flooding was caused by southerly winds that pushed a high tide, worsened by a full moon, into the city.

READ: Climate Change, Corruption Blamed For Venice Flood Devastation

Conte visits flood-ravaged Venice

While the Government authorities gear up to measure the damage caused by the flood in and around the city, the residents seemed non-compliant. People opened their shops and went back to their businesses despite knowing that they would have to close them again. Some even said that it was an adventurous experience. Italy Prime Minister Conte will head to meet the Mayor of Venice along with the emergency responders and meet people whose businesses were affected due to heavy tide. 

READ: Venice Flooded By The Second-highest Tide In Its History

Cultural treasures flooded after heavy tide

The historic basilica and many of the city squares and alleyways deep have been flooded. According to international media reports, Saint Mark's Square was submerged by more than one meter of water and the adjacent Saint Mark's Basilica was flooded for the sixth time in 1,200 years. However, no damage to the Church was reported. 

READ: Venice Flooding Nearly Touches Level Of Infamous 1966 Flood

READ: Venice Hit By Second Worst High Tide, Mayor Declares Disaster

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