'Ghost Rider': Chris Lynn Hot Talking Point After He Emits Steam During PSL Game

Cricket News

Chris Lynn became a subject of jokes after he was seen emitting heat during the PSL match between Peshawar Zalmi and Lahore Qalandars at Rawalpindi on Friday

Written By Karthik Nair | Mumbai | Updated On:
Chris

Chris Lynn became a subject of jokes after he was seen emitting heat during the (Pakistan Super League) PSL match between Peshawar Zalmi and Lahore Qalandars at the Rawalpindi Cricket Stadium on Friday. Lynn is one of the modern-day destructive power-hitting batsmen in the game's shortest format, especially in franchise cricket. Once he gets set, he gives a tough time to the rival teams as he has the ability to change the complexion of the game in powerplay overs. However, on Friday, Lynn was in the news not for his dynamic batting but for a strange incident.

Lynn emits heat while walking back to the dugout

This happened during the Lahore Qalandars run chase in a 12-over rain-curtailed contest. Chris Lynn had got his team off to a brisk start as he scored a quickfire 15-ball 30 at a strike rate of exactly 200. Unfortunately, just when it looked like he would make a quick work of the target, he was dismissed by Lewis Gregory in the fifth over. 

Nonetheless, what stood out here was that when the Australian opener was walking back to the dugout, he was seen emitting heat and it was just a matter of time before it went viral on social media. A Twitterati took to social media and wrote that he has never seen anything like this. He also posted a couple of laughing emojis and asked the viewers to explain the same.

Even the netizens came forward to have a gala time. Here are some of the reactions.

What causes this?

As per reports, this happens when cold, dry winter air comes into contact with hot, humid, shaven heads and causes the sweat to condense and evaporate. It was raining throughout the day in Rawalpindi with the maximum temperature being  10 °C and the minimum being 5 °C while the average temperature was 7 °C.

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