Updated March 17th, 2024 at 09:00 IST

Google Doodle celebrates St. Patrick's Day with homage to Ireland's scenic beauty

Google's handcrafted Doodle made with a wood burning technique showcases the beauty of Ireland.

Reported by: Business Desk
Google Doodle for St. Patrick's Day | Image:Google
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St. Patrick’s Day Doodle: Google Doodle marks the celebration of St. Patrick's Day with a picturesque illustration showcasing the serene landscapes of Ireland on March 17. Crafted using the 'wood burning technique,' the doodle depicts the transition from sunrise in the countryside to sunset in the city, enveloping viewers in the warmth and tranquillity of the Irish scenery. 

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Image credit: Google

Released on Sunday, March 17, the doodle is visible across several countries including the United States, Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Latvia, Croatia, Iceland, and Singapore, however, you will not be able to see the Doodle if you are in India.

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With the caption, "Put on something green because… it’s St Patrick’s Day! This handcrafted Doodle made with a wood burning technique showcases the beauty of Ireland," the doodle celebrates the spirit of the occasion with its heartfelt portrayal of the Irish landscape.

St. Patrick's Day, traditionally marked by lively parades, sees cities across Ireland hosting vibrant processions featuring traditional Irish dance, bodhráns, and fiddles. Notably, the largest St. Patrick's Day parade in the world takes place in New York City, drawing around two million spectators and boasting approximately 250,000 marchers each year.

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Historically, the tradition of St. Patrick's Day parades traces back to Boston in 1737, when Irish immigrants organised one of the earliest celebrations as a symbol of solidarity. While New York City now hosts the largest parade, Boston holds the honour of hosting the earliest festivities. 

Recognising its cultural significance, Ireland declared St. Patrick’s Day an official public holiday on March 17 1903, cementing its status as a global celebration of Irish heritage and culture.

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Published March 17th, 2024 at 09:00 IST