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Egypt's Great Pyramid: New Construction Theory Over 'abandoned Burial Chamber'

One of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the Egypt's great pyramid has now fuelled a new construction theory over the ancient society.

Egypt

Egypt's great pyramid located on the Giza Plateau believed to have been built during the Fourth Dynasty for the Pharaoh Khufu. One of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the only one still largely intact has now fuelled a new construction theory over the ancient society. An Egyptologist Dr. Chris Naunton told Express.co.uk that he suspected that the pyramid was going to be constructed with a subterranean chamber but the construction plan was later changed.

Egypt's great pyramid construction theory

The great pyramid is believed to have been constructed more than 4,500 years ago and has three known chambers inside. The lowest chamber was cut into the bedrock on which the pyramid was built and the experts still believe it to have been kept unfinished, reported the Express. An Egyptologist Dr Chris Naunton believes it could have been the intended final resting place of a mighty ruler. He said that they had decided to have the burial chamber contained within the mass of the pyramid rather than keeping it underground. He believes that construction remains unfinished as the people must have abandoned it. 

Dr. Chris Naunton told Express.co.uk that he thinks that it intended to be the burial chamber but the purpose disappeared when they had changed the plan. He added that Egyptians were comfortable with not finishing things. He said that if the king died during the construction of the Egyptian monument then a new king would dismantle the previous project and would start a new project.

He explained that in the last few years there was some experimental archaeology completed that showed very large blocks move far more easily over wet sand. He said that assumption should not be made that they had any type of advance technology. ‘Searching for the Lost Tombs of Egypt' author Dr. Chris Naunton said that he would like more evidence before giving a final verdict on the Great Pyramid’s construction.

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