23-feet Long World War II Bunker Belonging To 'Churchill's Secret Army' Found In Scotland

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A secret World War II-era bunker was found by the Forestry and Land Scotland's (FLS) survey technician in southern Scotland's Craigielands Forest.

Written By Bhavya Sukheja | Mumbai | Updated On:
23-feet

A secret World War II-era bunker was found by the Forestry and Land Scotland's (FLS) survey technician in southern Scotland's Craigielands Forest. According to an international media report, the bunker was unearthed during tree felling work in the Scottish Borders and is thought it was used as a base for an Auxiliary Unit, which was also known as Churchill's 'secret army'. The bunker was also missing from official records and measures 23 feet long by 10 feet wide. 

READ: Russian Sisters Reunited 78-years After Being Separated During World War II

READ: Children In Germany Find World War II Ammunitions From Pond Using Magnets

The FLS archaeologist Matt Ritchie reportedly said, that the discovery gives an insight into one of the most secretive units that were operating during WW2. He further added that earlier, it was really rare to find the bunker as their locations were always kept secret and now most were just buried or lost. Ritchie added that from records, it is known that around seven men used the bunker and at the time were armed with revolvers, submachine guns, a sniper's rifle and explosives. 

READ: Evacuations In Cologne Before World War II Bomb Defusing

World War II-era discoveries

In another similar discovery, three children in eastern Germany reportedly fished out World War II-era bullets and shells from a pond using powerful magnets. According to international media reports, the children found the bullets and shells in a village called Wolfis in Thuringia last year. 

A World War-II British bomb was also discovered in Italy's Brindisi city. According to reports, even after 75 years to the war, Germany is also still littered with explosives because of the intensive air raids by the British, US, and Soviet bombers. During the second world war, the Allied air force dropped several thousand bombs on Italy and some of the unexploded bombs are still being discovered in the country. The bomb disposal experts on numerous occasions said that the explosives could be potentially dangerous as sometimes, unexploded ordnance could explode even after decades of lying in dormancy as the old detonator can set off a bomb by itself.

READ: Italian City Discovers World War II-era British Bomb, Over 54,000 Evacuated

READ: Two Bravery Medals Awarded To First World War Hero Sold At Auction For £235,000

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