Belarusian Man Uses His Severed Finger To Unlock Smartphone, Watch Video

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53-year-old man from Belarus made headlines after he unlocked his smartphone using his severed thumb. Yuri Vinogradov lost his thumb to a circular chain.

Written By Riya Baibhawi | Mumbai | Updated On:
Belarusian man uses his severed finger to unlock smartphone, posts video

A 53-year-old man from Belarus made headlines after he unlocked his smartphone using his severed thumb. Yuri Vinogradov lost his thumb to a circular chain saw, the accident nearly three months ago. He then stored it in his freezer hoping that it would be sewed back by the doctors. However, due to his diabetic condition doctors advised him against the operation. 

However, he continued to keep his severed finger in the freezer and decided to conduct an experiment with the help of his son, Pavel. He later posted a video on Youtube which showed him unlocking his smartphone using his separated finger.  The two-minute-long clip shows him taking out his separated thumb from a small plastic bag which was kept inside a freezer. He then puts it on the phone’s unlock sensor but the phone does not unlock. Then he puts the finger in a glass and pours some hot water in it and then uses it again to unlock. The video concludes by showing him successfully unlocking it. 

Smartphone affect brain structure

Meanwhile, researchers in Germany have recently discovered that people who are addicted to their smartphones have slightly different brain structure to those who use their phones less. According to the reports, the researchers carried out MRI scans on 22 people that were 'addicted' to their phones and 26 who did not use their phones as regularly.

Read: Researchers Say Smartphone 'addiction' Can Possibly Change Brain Structure

Read: Distribution Of Free Smartphones Delayed Due To Coronavirus: Punjab CM

The researchers claimed that they faced a chicken or egg type of situation, meaning that the researchers were unsure if the changes in the brain occurred due to phone use or if the volume of grey matter dictated how much someone wanted to use their phone. The research was conducted at Heidelberg University.

According to reports, the researchers discovered that when people used their phones they showed reduced activity in the anterior cingulate cortex. The anterior cingulate cortex has been linked to a very broad range of cognitive processes and the researchers also found that individuals that used their phones often had reduced volume of grey matter in certain important areas.

Read: Scientists Unveil Smartphone App That Can Detect Jaundice In Newborns

Read: Lithium Reserves Found In Mandya, Smartphones & Electric Vehicles Could Get Cheaper

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