Last Updated:

Japan: Newborn Receives World's First Embryonic Liver Stem Cell Transplant

In a pioneering operation, doctors in Japan have successfully transplanted liver cells derived from embryonic stem cells, opening new possibilities of treatment

Japan: Doctors transplant liver cells from embryonic stem cells in newborn

In a pioneering operation, doctors in Japan have successfully transplanted liver cells derived from embryonic stem cells, opening new possibilities of treatment in infants. According to reports, the six-day-old was suffering from urea cycle disorder, a disease wherein the liver isn’t capable of breaking down toxic ammonia. However, the infant was too small to undergo a liver transplant as it is not considered safe until the child weighs at least six kilograms.

As a result, the doctors at the National Centre for Child Health and elopement decided to try what they called “Bridge treatment” until the baby was old enough for a transplant. As a part of the process, the medics injected the newborn with over 190 million cells derived from embryonic stem cells in blood vessels of the baby’s liver. The experiment was reportedly successful after level of blood Ammonia did not increase.

Read: ISS Scientists Will Now Grow Human Organs With Stem Cells In Space; Learn How

Read: Japan Requests Extradition Of Ghosn Smuggling Accused

“The patient did not see an increase in blood ammonia concentration and was able to successfully complete the next treatment", namely a liver transplant, the institute said in a press release.

According to reports, after spending six months in the hospital and receiving a liver transplant from its father the baby was recently discharged from the hospital. Announcing triumph, the institute in a statement said that the success of this trial demonstrates" safety in the world's first clinical trial" using human ES cells for patients with liver disease. 

Read: Viral Video Of Dad Dancing With Infant Baby Will Brighten Your Day; Watch Video

Read: 3 Migrant Labourers, An Infant Returning Home During Lockdown Killed In Road Accidents In U

First Published:
By 2030, 40% Indians will not have access to drinking water
SAVE WATER NOW
PEOPLE HAVE PLEDGED SO FAR