Scientists Decode Human Thinking, Emotions Using MRI And Computer Analysis

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Scientists at Pittsburgh's Carnegie Mellon University have found a way to decode human thoughts and emotions using MRI and computer analysis on November 17.

Written By Sounak Mitra | Mumbai | Updated On:
Scientists

Scientists at Pittsburgh's Carnegie Mellon University have found a way to decode human thoughts and emotions using MRI and computer analysis on November 17. Now scientists can actually identify what humans are thinking and feeling, according to the reports by Leslie  Stahl, a scientist at Pittsburgh's Carnegie Mellon University. Stahl first reported on a team of scientists from Pittsburgh's Carnegie Mellon University ten years ago who found a way to read minds. She came up with the discovery to identify the thoughts of people inside an MRI scanner. The team of scientists has ironically decoded the types of thoughts it can identify in the brain to emotions, highly abstract concepts, foreign languages, and even suicidal thinking.

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It's a whole new experience

Marcel Just, a neuroscientist told Stahl that being able to read minds and identify thoughts in our brains is a whole new experience. He further added that it is similar to being an astronomer when the first telescope is discovered or just being a biologist when the first microscope is developed. Just said that it is one of such discoveries that can study activity patterns in the brain when people think about ideas like spirituality, forgiveness, and gossip.He said that the pattern remains the same when people think in different languages.

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'Each emotion has its own characteristic values'

Just asked the students to come up with different feelings while having their brains scanned to study emotions. But again the results showed common patterns. He said that each emotion has its own characteristic values.
To demonstrate the discovery Jaime Woods, an associate producer agreed to get inside the MRI scanner and think about different situations shown to her on the screen. Just and his colleagues started exploring how the thought patterns can differ in the brains of people with disorders. They found out differences in the activity patterns of people contemplating suicide compared to healthy patterns of thinking. Just aims to create a dictionary of brain activation that will result in identifying different thoughts inside our minds.

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