Climate Change Is Making One Of The Ocean's Loudest Animals Even Louder: Study

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A new study has revealed that a small aquatic animal that also happens to be the ocean's loudest animal will continue to get louder thanks to climate change

Written By Digital Desk | Mumbai | Updated On:
Climate Change jeopardizes, warmer oceans are getting louder

A new study has revealed that a small aquatic animal that also happens to be the ocean's loudest animal will continue to get louder thanks to the continuous, extreme changes in global climate. The study showed that the animal continues to become louder with rising ocean temperatures. The report added that the results of the experiment show that climate change could have a major impact on the soundscape of the ocean.

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Shrimps who sound louder than a bullet

Even though the muddy green snapping shrimps, also known as the pistol shrimp, are about 2 inches in length, the effects they are likely to have inside the ocean and eventually outside water, are gruesome. One of the loudest animals on Earth, a snap of its claw creates a bubble which explodes. The sound is louder than a gunshot and creates shock waves underwater which, also helps it catch its prey.

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Warmer the water temperature, louder the sound

A research by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in San Diego, California, has identified a positive relationship between a warmer ocean temperature and a louder intensity in the snapping sound of the shrimp. Aran Mooney, a marine biologist at Wood Hole Oceanographic Institution and his colleague Ashlee Lillis have happened upon this relevation after the experiment they carried out with shrimp in their lab and by observing the shrimps in the ocean at different temperatures. The experiment only proved the snapping sound created by the shrimps gets louder when the temperature turns warmer.

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The consequences the snapping shrimp would have on life underwater and outside are evident, following the escalating rise in the change in climatic patterns. An increase in noise would undoubtedly have an adverse effect on the ecosystem besides the other aquatic animals that depend on sounds to catch their prey or communicate, like whales. Human activities above water, like fihsing, would also get affected following the massive increase in sound patterns inside the sea.

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(With Agency inputs)

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