Sudan Says 'life Has Returned To Normal' After Revolt Killed Two

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Sudan said that it has reopened its airspace on January 15 after the security forces were shut down in the wake of an armed revolt which left two people dead.

Written By Aanchal Nigam | Mumbai | Updated On:
Sudan

Sudan said that it has reopened its airspace on January 15 after the forces were shut down in the wake of an armed revolt which left two people dead. General Abdel-Fattah Burhan, head of the country’s ruling transitional council said in a press conference that “life has returned to normal” after the capital's airport was also shut down for several hours. A tense stand-off between the armed forces and intelligence officers also took place where the later had fired shots in the air demanding severance benefits. 

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However, while the situation turns normal in Sudan, the airport authorities in neighbouring Egypt said that all flights to Sudan remain suspended and cited security reasons. The previous bursts on the streets reportedly rocked the street life in several parts of Khartoum along with another Western city. Multiple videos were also circulated on social media showing the vast deployment of security forces and the intense exchange of gunfire.

Burhan also said that the armed forces will “not allow any coup to occur” and added its a “shame that weapons were raised in the faces of the people”. General Mohamed Othman al-Hussein, the chief of staff of the council quelled the mutiny with “minimal losses” and added that it killed two people while leaving at least four injured, including two police officials. 

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Separate statement by doctors

Meanwhile, in a separate statement, the doctors' union in Sudan reported that a father along with his two children were killed after an errant artillery shell struck the family's home in Khartoum suburb. The children died on the way to the hospital while the father reportedly died instantly. However, the difference in death toll has not yet been reconciled. Al-Hussain also said that by “using least amount of force possible”, the military stormed and retook the headquarters of an intelligence agency. 

The recent mutiny in Sudan was the latest development in the already fragile democratic transition after being under the authoritarian rule of former President Omar al-Bashir for three decades. A protest movement had ousted al-Bashir in April and then led to the creation of a joint military-civilian government last summer. 

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(With AP inputs)

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