This Dog Has Saved Dozens Of Koalas In Bushfire-hit Australia

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Taylor, the dog is winning hearts from all over the world for his outstanding contribution in the rescue process that has been taking place in Australia.

Written By Vishal Tiwari | Mumbai | Updated On:
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Taylor, the dog is winning hearts from all over the world for his outstanding contribution in the rescue process that has been taking place in Australia amid the ongoing bushfire crisis. According to international media reports, 4-year-old Taylor has been involved in rescuing dozens of koalas who were injured by the raging bushfires in the country. When told, "Koala, Find!", Taylor ventures into the burnt forest land to find injured koalas by sniffing out the scent of their fur or feces. Each time, Taylor finds a koala, she is rewarded with a treat or a tennis ball. 

Read: Secret Mission Saves Australia's 'dinosaur Trees' From Bushfires

Taylor, the savior

Ryan Tate, trainer at the Tate Animal Training Enterprise told the media that Taylor has been doing this when she was just a few months old. Ryan told the media that in ideal conditions when the sir is still, Taylor can small the koalas even if they are at top of a tree. In high wind conditions, she uses their fresh feces to find their location and then the experts scan the canopy to find the animal. Taylor has saved a lot of koalas during the ongoing bushfire season in Australia, which according to many is the worst summer of the decade. 

Read: Blind Labrador Abandoned On Streets Looking For Forever Home In Australia

Koalas have been worst affected by the ongoing bushfires in Australia with some reports suggesting that an estimated 80 percent of their habitat wiped out. According to Steven Selwood of South Australia Veterinary Emergency Management, there are only 9,000 koalas that remain out of the 46,000 that were thought to be on the island before this year's bushfire. Each day dozens of koalas come for treatment at Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park's makeshift hospital. 

Read: Baby Koala Named 'Hope' To Honour Animals Died In Australia Bushfires

Animal protection groups from across the globe are involved in the rescue and recovery process of wildlife in Australia. Animal welfare groups like Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service (WIRES) and Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) are helping towards the process and accepting donations on their official websites. The bushfire this season is seemingly unprecedented as an estimated 480 million animals and 1,000 homes have been affected by the inferno.   

Read: Australian Koalas Worst Hit By Raging Bushfires, Only 9k Remain Out Of 46k

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