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'Leave our colonial past behind' | Prince Charles To Visit Barbados As Guest Of Honour As Caribbean Island Becomes A Republic

The Prince of Wales, Prince Charles will visit Barbados as 'guest of honour' as the country will transition to a Republic within the Commonwealth.

Prince Charles

IMAGE: AP


The Prince of Wales, Prince Charles will visit Barbados as a 'guest of honour' as the country will transition to a Republic within the Commonwealth. The ceremony will officially remove the Queen of England, Queen Elizabeth II, as the head of state and mark Barbados as a republic.

The Prince of Wales will visit Barbados to mark Barbados’ transition to a Republic within the Commonwealth. As future Head of the Commonwealth, HRH has been invited by MiaAmor Mottley, Prime Minister of Barbados, to be Guest of Honour at the Republic Celebration events, Clarence House announced on Twitter on Friday.

"The Prince will also undertake a short programme of engagements in Barbados," Clarence House added in a Twitter statement. The event, which is set to take place later this month, will witness Dame Sandra Mason sworn in as president of Barbados. The swearing-in ceremony will take place on November 30, which is the 55th anniversary of Barbados gaining independence from Britain in 1966.

The announcement to move to republic status was made last September as the government decided to "fully leave (the) colonial past behind," the Evening Standard reported. However, the nation will remain a member of the Commonwealth.

Barbados to appoint the first President

With a population of about 3 lakh, Barbados is one of the most populated and wealthy Caribbean islands. Its change in status to a republic was recommended by constitutional review in 1998. Barbados' transition to a republic was announced, after "Barbadians wanted a Barbadian head of state. This is the ultimate statement of confidence in who we are and what we are capable of achieving," Sandra had said, Evening Standard reported.

Before Barbados, Guyana was the first former British colony to gain republic status in 1970, less than four years after gaining independence. It was followed by Trinidad and Tobago in 1976 and Dominica in 1977. However, all the three have stayed in Commonwealth. Meanwhile, Jamaica has also indicated that it might also opt for the change.

Image: AP

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