Last Updated:

NASA Astronauts Recreate Times Square's Ball Drop In Zero Gravity | Watch

Joining the New Year celebrations from 250 miles above the earth, astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) recreated the iconic ball drop moment

NASA astronauts recreate Times Square ball drop in zero gravity | Watch

Joining the New Year celebrations from 220 miles above the earth, astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) recreated the iconic ball drop moment in their own unique fashion. While the New York City tradition sees a giant crystal ball descends down a flag pole at the stroke of midnight, the ‘space edition’ of the tradition featured astronauts “drop” a globe in zero gravity. A video of Expedition 64 crew wishing people Happy New year while floating inside their “space lab” has now created a stir on the internet.

Recreating the famous tradition

Shared on Twitter by the official page of International Space Station (ISS), the video features the five-member crew extending greetings on the occasion of  New Year. “One of the most famous New Year’s Eve tradition is watching the ball drop at Times Square,” a member starts by saying. 

However, they assert that since it was zero gravity situations, they’ve created their own version. They also added that one of the main aims behind it was to inspire people to celebrate the occasion in their own ways.  As they say this, a member drops the globe, which immediately rises up in the absence of gravitational pull. Following which, all the team members themselves begin to float as the video concludes.

Read: NASA Shares Stunning Images From 2020 That Unfold Complexities Of Earth From Space

Read: Butterfly Nebula Voted Favourite 2020 Hubble Image, NASA Says 'excellent Choice'

Since shared, the unique recreation of the famous tradition has won the hearts of people. It has not been viewed over 75 thousand times but also racked up a bandwagon of comments from zealous netizens. "Because gravity draws objects with mass toward objects with greater mass. And Happy New Year to all of you, too!," wrote a user. 

"I would love to see you show us a video of what happens to free-floating items in the ISS when you make station-keeping burns. Assuming you have measured the forces, what is the range of “Gs” experienced? Is it even .01 G?," wrote another user. 

Read: 'Step Outside, Look Up': NASA Shares Stunning Image Of 'Wolf Moon', Explains What It Is

Read: Butterfly Nebula Voted Favourite 2020 Hubble Image, NASA Says 'excellent Choice'

 

 

Get the latest entertainment news from India & around the world. Now follow your favourite television celebs and telly updates. Republic World is your one-stop destination for trending Bollywood news. Tune in today to stay updated with all the latest news and headlines from the world of entertainment.

First Published: