Last Solar Eclipse Of Decade Visible From Different Parts Of India

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Last solar eclipse of the decade started at 7:59 am on Dec 26 and will be visible as a partial eclipse from different parts of India such as Delhi, Kerala etc.

Written By Ruchit Rastogi | Mumbai | Updated On:
Last solar eclipse of the decade will be visible from different parts of India

Last solar eclipse of the decade started at 7:59am on December 26 and will be visible as a partial eclipse from different parts of India such as Kerala, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Delhi. The solar eclipse is also called the ring of fire and was first viewed from the capital city of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. After the partial eclipse, the annular eclipse was visible from 9:04am. According to reports, the maximum part of the eclipse will take place at 10:47am (IST) followed by a complete eclipse at 12:30pm (IST) at Guam located in the western Pacific ocean. However, India will witness the annular solar eclipse for a period of only three minutes.

Decade's last solar eclipse

In India, a partial solar eclipse will be visible from different parts of the country depending on the geographical position of the eclipse. According to reports, till the time the eclipse does not end, temples such as the Tirumala Tirupati Balaji Temple (Andhra Pradesh), Sabarimala temple (Kerala) and the Meenakshi temple (Madurai) will remain closed and will only be opened after the ritualistic purification process.

Read: Bhubaneshwar To Witness Partial Eclipse Of Sun From 8:20 Am To 11:28 Am

Read: Last Solar Eclipse Of 2019: Date, Timings, Where To Watch, When To Watch And More

'People need to be careful'

Astronomers have warned the public to use proper equipment if they want to view the eclipse because the ultraviolet and infrared rays of the sun can lead to severe damage to the retina. While talking to a local media outlet, director of MP Birla Planetarium, Debiprosad Duari, said that no one should directly look at the sun with taking proper precautions, adding that even though majority of the sun's surface is concealed by the moon during partial eclipse, the remaining light can alone cause severe damage to the eyes.

According to astronomical experts, people should view the solar eclipse through a pinhole camera or a telescope used on a proper surface. A solar eclipse takes place when the earth and the sun have the moon pass between them, partially or completely concealing the sun for a person on earth. The annular solar eclipse takes place when the moon covers the sun's centre, leaving the visible edges of the sun to form what is also called a ring of fire.

Read: IN PICTURES: World Experiences 2019's Only 'Total Solar Eclipse' Lasting 4 Mins 33 Seconds Long

Read: Nasa's Hubble Space Telescope Captures Stunning Images Of A Distant Galaxy

(With inputs from agencies)

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