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Updated January 6th, 2024 at 17:02 IST

US safety board investigating emergency landing of Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 MAX 9

The Alaska Airlines Flight 1282 experienced an incident soon after departure.

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 Alaska Airlines planes are shown parked at gates at sunrise
Alaska Airlines planes are shown parked at gates at sunrise | Image:AP
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Sudden landing: Independent US government investigative agency The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the emergency landing made by an Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 MAX 9.

The California-bound plane made an emergency landing shortly after taking off from Portland.

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NTSB is responsible for investigating civil transportation accidents.

The Incident

Alaska Airlines Flight 1282, enroute Ontario in California had experienced an incident soon after departure and landed safely back at Portland at 5:26 p.m. Pacific Time.

The plane carried 174 passengers and six crew, according to the airline and Flightradar24 data.

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Social media posts showed a window and a portion of the side wall missing on the airplane.

Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration have not issued a statement or made a comment on the matter yet.

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Past Troubles

Notably, Boeing, which is an American multinational into design, manufacture, and sale of airplanes, rotorcraft, rockets, satellites, telecommunications equipment, and missiles, had requested the Federal Aviation Administration for  an exemption from key safety standards on the 737 MAX 7.

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Boeing 737 MAX 7, the smallest member of Boeing’s newest jet family, is not yet certified. The airline maintains of constant investigations, but the incident does not speak for its cause.

Since August, earlier models of the MAX currently flying passengers in the US have had to limit use of the jet’s engine anti-ice system after Boeing discovered a defect in the system with potentially catastrophic consequences.

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In its petition to the FAA, Boeing said the breakup of the engine nacelle is “extremely improbable,” maintaining that an exemption will not reduce safety.

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Published January 6th, 2024 at 10:59 IST

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