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Updated February 22nd, 2024 at 15:22 IST

Government needs to embrace Green Revolution 2.0 for sustainable agriculture: GTRI

The call for action also includes raising awareness among farmers about adopting water-saving technologies.

Reported by: Business Desk
Agriculture
Government needs to embrace Green Revolution 2.0 for sustainable agriculture: GTRI  | Image:Pexels
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GTRI's Green Revolution 2.0: The Global Trade Research Initiative (GTRI), an economic think tank, emphasised the need for the government to usher in the Green Revolution 2.0.

The initiative aims to promote the cultivation of less water-intensive crops like pulses and oilseeds, reduce water demand, and guarantee minimum support prices (MSP) for these crops. The call for action also includes raising awareness among farmers about adopting water-saving technologies and ending free electricity for agriculture.

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GTRI Founder Ajay Srivastava highlighted the importance of restoring the crop mix that existed before the Green Revolution 1.0, emphasising the need to address water-intensive crops like paddy, which consume excessive amounts of water. The report suggests that paddy cultivation, heavily reliant on groundwater, contributes significantly to groundwater depletion, particularly in states like Punjab and Haryana.

Legal guarantee for MSP 

The report also addressed farmers' demands, including a legal guarantee for MSP and farm debt waivers, stating that MSP and free electricity schemes favour water-intensive crops like paddy over environmentally sustainable alternatives.

Furthermore, the report discussed the stance at the World Trade Organisation (WTO), highlighting the challenges faced by the government regarding its MSP support exceeding the permissible limits under WTO agreements.

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As the government prepares for the WTO's 13th ministerial conference in Abu Dhabi starting February 26, the issue of MSP support and agricultural subsidies remains a critical agenda item. The GTRI emphasises the need for a permanent solution to address the challenges posed by the current WTO agreements on agriculture, which are seen as discriminatory against developing nations. 

(with PTI inputs)

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Published February 22nd, 2024 at 14:13 IST

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