Calcutta HC Stays Deportation Of Rohingya Couple To "uphold The Spirit Of Humanity"

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The Calcutta High Court on Tuesday stayed the deportation of a Rohingya couple who had illegally entered India back in 2017 and was about to be deported back

Written By Ananya Varma | Mumbai | Updated On:
Rohingya

The Calcutta High Court on Tuesday stayed the deportation of a Rohingya couple who had illegally entered India back in 2017 and was about to be deported back by Indian Authorities. The bench which was headed by Justice Sabyasachi Bhattacharya not only issued a stay order but also a notice to the Bengal Government to provide basic amenities to the couple to help them "live a life with dignity."  The bench said that it was taking this decision to "uphold the spirit of humanity." 

Read: International court judges authorise Rohingya investigation

"In view of the imminent plight of the petitioners, who, despite having basic human rights in consonance with the Fundamental Rights provided by the Constitution of India as well as the U.N. Charter and the norms of any civilized society, a minimum protection ought to be given to the petitioners till the writ petition is decided, in order to uphold the spirit of humanity, if not the Fundamental Rights enshrined in the Constitution of India, which is the grundnorm of all Indian statutes," read the order. 

The couple Abdur Sukur and Anowara Begum belong to the Rohingya community, and in their 64-page long writ petition to the UNHCR had said that they did not want to be deported back to Myanmar “to face persecution” as they have applied for refugee status in New Delhi. They stated that deportation of such sorts would be equal to a death sentence on them. The Centre had passed a decision back in 2017 where it decided to deport 40,000 Rohingya Muslims, who had illegally entered India and taken refuge. 

Read: Bangladesh FM Momen says Myanmar has 'softened' stance on Rohingya issue post ICJ hearing

Rohingya Exodus 

Nearly 7,40,000 Rohingya Muslims were forced to take refuge in several camps in Bangladesh after Myanmar’s military launched crackdown on the minority group. The crackdown on minorities tarnished Suu Kyi's global image, following which Amnesty International revoked its highest honour -- the Ambassador of Conscience Award that it had conferred on the State Counsellor in 2009.After Suu Kyi’s defence at the ICJ, the human rights organisation in a statement accused the leader of downplaying the severity of the crimes committed against the Rohingya Muslims. 

Read: Nearly 100 Rohingya face prison time in Myanmar as Suu Kyi defends genocide charges

Read: Aung Suu Kyi faces Rohingya genocide trail at Hague, Myanmar refuses allegations

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