Holi Celebrations: Flowers Replace Colours Amid Coronavirus Threat In UP's Mathura

General News

People on Monday morning thronged to temples to offer prayers on the occasion of Holika Dahan. People across all diversities and demographics celebrate it.

Written By Digital Desk | Mumbai | Updated On:
Holi

People on Monday morning thronged to temples to offer prayers on the occasion of Holika Dahan. People across all diversities and demographics celebrate the festival with much zeal and zest. 

Holi is one of the major festivals of India which falls in March every year. Keeping the occasion in mind, people thronged to temples on Monday morning to offer prayers on the occasion. 

READ | PM Modi to skip Holi milans; takes lead amid Coronavirus experts' 'no gatherings' advice

In the Mathura city of Uttar Pradesh, a sea of devotees flocked to the Banke Bihari Temple dedicated to Lord Krishna to celebrate. 

The history of Mathura holds significance in the festival of Holi. According to Hindu mythology, Lord Krishna visited his beloved Radha's town Barsana from Nandgaon in Mathura to celebrate the festival with her. 

The city witnessed the onset of large numbers in Mathura Temples. The devotees had come with sweets and colours in their hands. The devotees were seen standing in a queue to get a glimpse of the deity. Priests were playfully throwing colours and using water guns to a gathered mass. 

READ | Amidst Coronavirus outbreak, health experts advise skipping Holi

Amid the festive vibes, the outbreak of Coronavirus was a cause of concern. 

Whereas in the State of Punjab, people too were excited about Holi. In Amritsar's Shiwala Temple, people replaced colours with flowers in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak. The devotees offered flowers to Shivlinga.

One individual Girish Sharma, who showed concern towards the virus said, "Today the festival of Holi is being celebrated with great reverence with flowers due to coronavirus."

He further added, "People are scared about the coronavirus, which is why we are only using flowers to ensure that we don't play Holi with colours."

READ | Defence Minister Rajnath Singh to skip Holi Milan celebrations amidst Coronavirus scare

The aim to replace colours with flowers was also used to raise awareness about COVID-19. Around the temple premise, posters were put up to urge people to celebrate the festival with flowers. It also aimed at giving up on synthetic colours that are harmful to the skin. 

READ | Why is Holi celebrated in India? Here is some insight into the backstory of Holi

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