Advertisement

Updated February 8th, 2024 at 17:24 IST

Jammu and Kashmir Latest Victim of Climate Crisis as January Temperatures Soar to 40-Year High

As residents grapple with the implications of these climatic anomalies, experts suggest that such shifts could be attributed to broader global climate patterns.

Zeenat Zeeshan Fazil
Jammu and Kashmir experiences hottest January in 40 years
Jammu and Kashmir experiences hottest January in 40 years | Image:Republic
Advertisement

Srinagar: Jammu and Kashmir has experienced an unprecedented warm and dry January, according to data released by the Meteorological Centre Srinagar. Srinagar city, along with several other parts of the region, bore witness to the warmest January in over four decades, with temperatures soaring to levels not seen since 1981.

“The mean maximum temperature in Srinagar reached 11.9 degrees Celsius, while in Gulmarg and Banihal, it stood at 5.7 degrees Celsius and 16.9 degrees Celsius, respectively,” informs MeT officials. However, despite the warmth, precipitation remained scarce, marking the second driest January in the past 40 years.

Advertisement

“Srinagar received a mere 3.0 mm of precipitation throughout the month, reminiscent of the dry spell experienced in January 2018 when only 1.2 mm of rainfall or snowfall occurred,” informs them.

The situation was different in the winter capital of Jammu and Kashmir, where Jammu city recorded its lowest mean maximum temperature for January in over four decades. The mean maximum temperature in Jammu stood at 13.4 degrees Celsius, a record low since 1983.

Advertisement

As per the Meteorological Centre here, January 2024 was one of the driest and warmest in the last 43 years for most stations across Jammu and Kashmir, except for the plains of Jammu, including Samba and Kathua. Moreover, the mean minimum temperatures for January were observed to be -3.2 degrees Celsius in Srinagar, 5.5 degrees Celsius in Jammu, -3.9 degrees Celsius in Gulmarg and 0.1 degrees Celsius in Banihal.

Pertinently, Ski-resort Gulmarg saw one of its highest mean minimum temperatures in the last 43 years, emphasising the exceptional nature of this winter.

Advertisement

“I’ve lived in Srinagar all my life, and I’ve never experienced a January like this. The lack of snow is concerning, especially considering its role in replenishing our water sources. We’re bracing ourselves for potential water shortages in the coming months,” said Ghulam Rasool Khan, a local.

As residents grapple with the implications of these climatic anomalies, experts suggest that such shifts could be attributed to broader global climate patterns.

Advertisement

“The climatic anomalies witnessed in Jammu and Kashmir align with the patterns we’re seeing worldwide due to global climate change,” said Agricultural Scientist Prof. Parvez Ahmed. He stresses the importance of recognizing these patterns to address their impacts effectively.

Prof. Ahmed emphasizes that the effects of the warmest and driest January in 43 years extend far beyond mere weather statistics. “Such events have far-reaching implications for agriculture, water resources and ecosystem dynamics,” he explains.

Advertisement

Published February 8th, 2024 at 17:24 IST

Your Voice. Now Direct.

Send us your views, we’ll publish them. This section is moderated.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Whatsapp logo