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Updated December 17th, 2023 at 19:11 IST

Scientists Unveil First Mind-Reading Helmet: Writes Your Thoughts

UTS scientists unveil mind-reading helmet: translates thoughts to text. Breakthrough for speech-impaired individuals. Non-invasive and portable

Garvit Parashar
UTS First Mind-Reading Helmet
UTS First Mind-Reading Helmet | Image: Image: UTS
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UTS scientists unveil mind-reading helmet, a breakthrough for speech-impaired individuals. The device translates thoughts to text, providing a non-invasive and portable solution.


Researchers from the University of Technology Sydney's GrapheneX-UTS Human-centric Artificial Intelligence Centre have unveiled a groundbreaking invention – a portable, non-invasive device capable of translating silent thoughts into text. This technological marvel holds the potential to revolutionize communication for individuals facing speech impediments due to conditions such as paralysis or stroke, while also paving the way for seamless interaction between humans and machines.

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In a recent study, participants wore a cap equipped with an electroencephalogram (EEG) to capture brain activity, allowing the device to interpret silent thoughts into readable text. Utilizing a smart artificial intelligence model named DeWave, the EEG recordings were transformed into coherent sentences, providing users with a unique mind-reading experience.

A video demonstration showcased the device successfully translating complex sentences, such as "Good afternoon! I hope you're doing well. I'll start with a cappuccino, please, with an extra shot of espresso," into a concise and accurate written response.

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CT Lin, Director of the GrapheneX-UTS HAI Centre, highlighted the significance of this research, stating, "This research represents a pioneering effort in translating raw EEG waves directly into language, marking a significant breakthrough in the field. The integration with large language models is also opening new frontiers in neuroscience and AI."

Despite encountering challenges, the study achieved a 40% success rate among 29 participants. Study author Yiqun Duan noted that while the model excelled in matching verbs, there were nuances with nouns, leading to synonymous pairs instead of precise translations. Nevertheless, the model produced meaningful results by aligning keywords and forming similar sentence structures.

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The study's use of non-invasive EEG signals through a cap, as opposed to brain-implanted electrodes, showcased a performance surpassing previous benchmarks in EEG translation. Additionally, the researchers emphasized the device's advantages over other invasive technologies, such as Elon Musk's Neuralink, citing its non-invasiveness, relative affordability, and portability.

As the research continues to advance, this mind-reading device holds promise for improving communication for those with speech-related challenges and exploring new horizons in the intersection of neuroscience and artificial intelligence.

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Published December 17th, 2023 at 19:11 IST

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