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Updated May 2nd, 2021 at 19:25 IST

Astronaut Soichi Noguchi shares photo of Pyramids clicked from ISS, see pic

Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi, who splashed down on earth earlier today, has shared a special photograph that he clicked from the ISS.

Riya Baibhawi
Image: JAXA/Pixabay
Image: JAXA/Pixabay | Image:self
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Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi, who splashed down on earth earlier today, has shared a special photograph that he clicked from the International Space Station (ISS) during his stay there. Taking to Twitter, Noguchi posted a stunningly detailed photograph of the Great Pyramids of Giza, a world heritage site constructed by the ancient Egyptians. Alongside, he also revealed that the photograph was particularly significant as it was clicked on his last day on the station.

The panoramic picture not only features the architectural marvel but also the neighbouring Al Giza Desert. Additionally, it also features nearby residential settlements. Interestingly, the picture was shared before Noguchi landed back on earth.

"The final day on #ISS – I got best shot of #Giza#Pyramid#worldheritage The Great Pyramid of Giza was caught cleanly today," he wrote while sharing the picture.

Meanwhile, the photograph has stormed the internet racking up nearly 20 thousand likes and a multitude of comments. “It’s like one of those illusions where you can’t tell if they’re 3D or massive holes in the ground,” shared a Twitter user. In agreement, an individual wrote, “True.”

Crew-1 Splashdown

SpaceX’s Dragon capsule, ferrying four astronauts back from the International Space Station (ISS), made a successful landing on May 2. All the four astronauts belonging to SpaceX’s Crew-I Mission splashed down in the Gulf of Mexico near Panama City at 2:56 a.m. EDT, a minute ahead of the scheduled time. All four main parachutes could be seen deploying just before splashdown, which was also visible in the infrared. Seconds later, a recovery ship retrieved the capsule from the sea, ending their crew’s 6-month long mission. The astronauts are the first US crew to make a nighttime splashdown since 1968, during the Apollo 8 mission to orbit the moon.

NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 mission launched November 15, 2020, on a Falcon 9 rocket from the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The astronauts named the spacecraft Resilience, in honour of their families, colleagues, and fellow citizens and highlighting the dedication displayed by the teams involved with the mission and demonstrating that there is no limit to what humans can achieve when they work together. Crew Dragon Resilience docked to the Harmony module’s forward port of the space station November 16, nearly 27 hours after liftoff.

Image: JAXA/Pixabay

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Published May 2nd, 2021 at 19:25 IST

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