PUBG Mobile Addict Gave Up On Food, Sent To Rehab

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PUBG Mobile addiction in children has been a growing concern among parents these days. With the popularity of PUBG Mobile at its peak, new cases surface.

Written By Tech Desk | Mumbai | Updated On:
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PUBG Mobile addiction in children has been a growing concern among parents these days. With the popularity of PUBG Mobile at its peak, new cases of PUBG mobile addiction continue to surface and make the headlines. According to a report, a 16-year-old boy from Alipurduar, West Bengal was sent to a rehabilitation centre to treat his PUBG Mobile addiction. Reportedly, the boy's addiction to PUBG Mobile was so severe that he had also given up on food apart from day to day activities. Secretary of the rehab centre Biswajit Dey was quoted as saying that the boy had become very weak as he ate properly only once in five or six days.

"Our first duty now is to feed him. He ate a little food yesterday night and we hope he can join mainstream life very soon," said Dey.

PUBG addict fakes kidnapping after parents take away his phone

PUBG addiction at its peak

Recently, a PUBG addict faked his own kidnapping and demanded ransom from parents after his mobile phone was taken away by them. Here's what happened: A 16-year-old boy went missing for a few days. The boy disappeared on October 11 after he told his parents that he is going to meet his friend. Parents reported a missing complaint after he did not come back home. Shockingly enough, the boy has reportedly been preparing for the entrance examination of IIT and regularly attends coaching for the same. Police successfully tracked him down a few days later.

This is the extent to which the addiction to the game has reached, especially in India where parents have often been seen concerned about their children's addiction to mobile gaming. In India, parents often seem concerned about their children's addiction to mobile gaming and there have also been some cases of aggression among PUBG players who tend to get violent and reckless at times.  The World Health Organization (WHO) also considers addiction to online mobile games like PUBG and Fortnite as a mental health disorder.

Psychiatrists on PUBG Mobile addition 

Earlier this year, an 11-year-old boy moved the Bombay High Court Thursday seeking a ban on PUBG Mobile. Ahad Nizam, who filed the public interest litigation through his mother, had said the game promotes violence, aggression and cyber-bullying. The court should direct the Maharashtra government to ban it, the PIL had said.

(Story picture -- For representational purpose)

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