Updated January 21st, 2024 at 13:19 IST

Dhanushkodi: Explore Ram Setu’s Origin Point And These Fascinating Tourist Spots

Dhanushkodi, also known as India's ghost town, promises a fascinating experience to all travelers. Make sure you explore these spots.

Reported by: Akanksha Arora
Dhanushkodi: Explore Ram Setu’s Origin Point And These Fascinating Tourist Spots | Image:Akanksha Arora/Republic
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Dhanushkodi, located at the Southern tip of Indian mainland, is considered a sacred place, owing to its reference in the Ramayana. A day ahead of the Ram Mandir Pran Pratishtha in Ayodhya, Prime Minister Narendra Modi visited offered prayers in Sri KothandaramaSwamy Temple at Dhanushkodi. He also visited Arichalmunai, which is said to be the place from where the Ram Setu was built. 

Apart from its coastal charm and religious significance, it also has a completely different side, which is that of being an abandoned town. Located at the south-eastern tip of Pamban island in Tamil Nadu, the town was destroyed during the 1964 Rameswaram cyclone. Although devoid of inhabitants, Dhanushkodi remains a prominent tourist attraction because of its historical and mythological significance. 

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File photo of Dhanushkodi | Image: Akanksha Arora/Republic 

If you are planning to take a trip to Dhanushkodi, make sure you visit these tourist spots.

Dhanushkodi beach 

The Dhanushkodi beach is one of the most prominent attractions of this quaint town. It is a white sand beach, which is mostly deserted. On your visit, you don’t have to worry about large crowds or beach goers. Sit for hours as you stare at the never ending ocean waves crashing on the white sand. 

File photo of Dhanushkodi Beach | Image: Akanksha Arora/Republic 
File photo of Dhanushkodi Beach | Image: Akanksha Arora/Republic

Pamban island/bridge 

Located about 20 kilometres away from Dhanushkodi, Pamban island is another prominent tourist spot. This deep blue sea island is another spectacle and is considered as one of the most beautiful islands in the region. The best part about visiting this island is that you cross the Pamban bridge, which again, offers a spectacular view of the endless sea. Visit during the sunset hours and you will have the best time of your life as you see the sky changing its colours, right above the deep blue sea. 

File photo of Pamban bridge | Image: Akanksha Arora/Republic 

Church and station ruins 

Before the cyclone hit Dhanushkodi, there was a railway station and church close to the shore. Although it was all destroyed in the cyclone, the remnants have survived and it is so fascinating to see. However, with evolving times, these spots have become a point of tourist attraction. You will find many local vendors selling things like bracelets, mirrors which have been adorned by shellwork. There are also multiple food stalls, serving the local cuisines, and everyone’s favourite coconut water.

File photo of Dhanushkodi | Image: Akanksha Arora/Republic 
File photo of Dhanushkodi | Image: Akanksha Arora/Republic 

 

Arichal Munai 

This spot has a lot of historical and spiritual relevance. This is the Ram Setu view point. Meaning, it is the place from where the Ram Setu starts. This is also believed to be the end of the bridge which Lord Rama had broken using his bow and arrow. 

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The road is surrounded by beaches on both sides, thus providing an enthralling view. There is also a small temple point. The road ends at the beach with an Indian emblem depicted pillar. The beach also happens to be the confluence of Bay of Bengal and Indian Ocean and is closely guarded by the coast guard. The Sri Lankan border is just about a few kilometres away from this place. 

File photo of Arichal Munai | Image: Akanksha Arora/Republic 
File photo of Arichal Munai | Image: Akanksha Arora/Republic 

Ramanathaswamy Temple

Located about 20 kilometres from Dhanushkodi, Ramanathaswamy temple in Rameshwaram happens to be a prominent spot. People from all across the country visit this shrine to seek blessings. It is said that no Hindu’s journey is complete without a pilgrimage to both Varanasi and Rameswaram. With its magnificent structure, long corridors, aesthetically carved pillars, the temple is adorned with a towering 38-metre Gopuram. It was built in the 12th century. It is also one of the twelve Jyothirlinga temples, where Shiva is worshipped in the form of a Jyotirlingam.

File photo of Ramanathaswamy Temple | Image: Akanksha Arora/Republic 
File photo of Republic | Image: Akanksha Arora/Republic 

Just 20 kilometres from Rameshwaram, Dhanushkodi offers a fascinating experience to all its tourists.

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Published January 21st, 2024 at 13:19 IST