Huge Jellyfish Melts On Beach Amid Heat Wave In Bushfire-hit Australia

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In a shocking incident, a huge jellyfish washed up on the shores of Australian beaches that have melted due to scorching heat, according to the reports.

Written By Sounak Mitra | Mumbai | Updated On:
Jellyfish

In a shocking incident, a huge jellyfish washed up on the shores of Australian beaches that have melted due to scorching heat, according to the reports. School of jellyfish were seen sprawling across the sand in Wongaling Beach in North Queensland last week while the temperatures hovered between 35C and 36C. Some of the jellyfish measured as big as 60cm wide and the swimmers have been cautioned to stay away from it as it carries a painful sting. While speaking to the media reports, Kerryn Bell, who runs a boat tour group in the area said the jellyfish looked like 'melting ice-creams'.

READ: Selena Gomez's Hawaii Vacation Turns Scary As She Gets Stung By Man O' War Jellyfish

Several beaches closed over the weekend

Bell further added that they washed ashore during the big tides and have been exposed themselves to bright sun and appeared like they are starting to melt. Other beaches along the Queensland's Far North Coast have been filled with jellyfish in the recent weeks. Recently a woman had to be rushed to hospital after she was stung in Port Douglas, as per the reports. A seven-year-old boy was stung at Kewarra Beach and a five-year-old girl was stung Palm Cove. A lot of beaches along the coastline in Cairns were closed over the weekend after 30 jellyfish were found by the lifeguards. Jay March, Surf Life Saving Queensland Cairns lifeguard supervisor urged the people to stay out of the water.

READ: RARE: Aurelia Jellyfish Swarm Crimean Shores, Make For An Unusual Spectacle

He said on February 13 that it is unsafe to have the beaches open at this point in time, particularly with these prevailing conditions. He added that the beaches will be closed for some period of time and would not be reopened until the conditions change. 

Similarly, swarms of Jellyfish invaded the Black sea in unusual natural display in Cremia. The photos which have gone viral on social media show innumerable jellyfish of the Aurelia genus lurking on the shores of Balaklava Bay in the Russian annexed Crimea. Reportedly, while jellyfish are fairly common in the area, such large numbers are fairly unusual at this time of the year.

READ: Swarms Of Jellyfish Invade Crimean Shore In A Rare Natural Phenomena

READ: Diver Comes Across Colossal Ambling Jellyfish, 'Jelfie' Goes Viral

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