Advertisement

Updated January 8th, 2024 at 13:27 IST

Missing part of Alaska Airlines plane that blew off mid-air found in Portland teacher's backyard

The missing portion of Alaska Airlines' plane that blew off when the aircraft was in mid-air has been found in a backyard in Portland.

Reported by: Bhagyasree Sengupta
 Alaska Airlines planes are shown parked at gates at sunrise
Alaska Airlines planes are shown parked at gates at sunrise | Image:AP
Advertisement

Portland - The missing portion of Alaska Airlines' plane that blew off when the aircraft was in mid-air has been found in a backyard in Portland. On Sunday (local time), a school teacher in Portland named Bob reached out to the National Transportation Safety Board after he found the missing portion of a Boeing 737 MAX 9 fuselage door plug in his yard, NBC News reported. The federal investigators have been searching for the door plug ever since it blew off mid-air while the plane was taking off from Portland on Friday.

"I'm excited to announce that we found the door plug," National Transportation Safety Board Chair Jennifer Homendy said at the end of a news conference. She noted that the school teacher sent two photos of the item to confirm that it was the portion of the plane. "We're going to go pick that up and make sure that we begin analyzing it," Homendy exclaimed. Apart from the portion of the aircraft, the authorities also found two cell phones. One of the cellphones was found in the yard and the other one was found on the side of the road. 

Advertisement

How the investigation became complicated

During the presser, the agency chair stated that NTSB witnessed several factors that complicated the probe. On the first full day of investigation, the plane’s cockpit voice recorder’s record of the event was inadvertently taped over, and, at the time, the door plug had not been found. “That is unfortunately a loss for us,” Homendy said, lamenting the loss of voice data.  “Because that information is key, not just for our investigation, but for improving aviation safety," she added. In response to this, Homendy noted that NTSB is calling for expanding the minimum time recorded on the devices from 2 hours to 25 hours. "I cannot emphasize enough how important that is for safety," she said. The device recorded the over-the-flight data because someone failed to power it down, NBC News reported. 

Advertisement

Published January 8th, 2024 at 13:27 IST

Your Voice. Now Direct.

Send us your views, we’ll publish them. This section is moderated.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Whatsapp logo