Advertisement

Updated December 30th, 2023 at 12:55 IST

Nikki Haley says, as president, she would pardon Trump, if he is convicted

Haley's statement aligns her with other prominent Republicans, including Florida Governor Ron DeSantis and entrepreneur Vivek Ramaswamy.

Digital Desk
Nikki Haley
Nikki Haley | Image:AP
Advertisement

Former United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley made headlines after stating at a New Hampshire campaign event that if she were to become president, she would pardon former President Donald Trump if he were found guilty of the numerous charges he currently faces. These charges span across Florida, New York, and Georgia, relating to allegations of election interference, mishandling classified materials, and more.

Responding to a question from a 9-year-old at the event covered by NBC News, Haley expressed her stance, saying, "I would pardon Trump," emphasizing that it would be in the best interest of the country. "What's in the best interest of the country is not to have an 80-year-old man sitting in jail that continues to divide our country," she added.

Advertisement

Haley is not the first one to have expressed this intent

Haley's statement aligns her with other prominent Republicans, including Florida Governor Ron DeSantis and entrepreneur Vivek Ramaswamy, who have signalled support for a potential pardon for Trump. However, her remarks have stirred controversy, drawing criticism from former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie.

Advertisement

Christie is not pleased

Christie rebuked Haley for making such statements even before the trial in the election interference case against Trump had begun. "Well, what that should tell the American people is that she believes in two systems of justice: one for all of us and one for the most powerful," Christie commented.

Advertisement

This is not the first instance of Christie voicing disapproval of Haley's actions. Earlier, he criticized her for evading a definitive answer regarding her acceptance of a potential position in a second Trump administration, branding her stance as "insulting."

Here is what you need to know

The idea of offering a pardon prior to conviction holds historical precedence, notably demonstrated when President Gerald Ford pardoned former President Richard Nixon for any crimes he may have committed in the Watergate scandal.

Haley's assertion regarding a potential pardon for Trump has ignited discussions, with opinions divided over whether such a move would serve the nation's best interests or undermine the principles of justice. The conversation continues as the legal proceedings against Trump unfold, leaving questions about the future political landscape and the implications of potential executive clemency. The controversy sparked by Haley's remarks reflects the deep divisions and debates within the Republican Party regarding Trump's legacy.

Advertisement

Published December 30th, 2023 at 12:55 IST

Your Voice. Now Direct.

Send us your views, we’ll publish them. This section is moderated.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Whatsapp logo