Australian Croc Wrangler Joins Bid To Save Tyre-tied Reptile In Indonesia

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An Australian television personality has joined a bid to help capture a giant Indonesian crocodile and remove a motorcycle tyre stuck around its neck.

Written By Sounak Mitra | Mumbai | Updated On:
Australian

An Australian television personality has joined a bid to help capture a giant Indonesian crocodile and remove a motorcycle tyre stuck around its neck, as per reports. Matt Wright, host of National Geographic's Monster Croc Wrangler show was on the island of Sulawesi on February 13 with its team all prepared to save the tyre-tied reptile.  Wright told his 2,00,000 followers on Instagram that he along with his team had trapped a smaller crocodile on February 12 "training for the main event". He added that catching the bigger beast was a challenge because of the tough environment and the main fact was it wasn't hungry due to plenty amount of food in the river. 

READ: Indonesia: Authorities Cancel Contest For Removing Tyre Off Crocodile's Neck

Wright accompanied by fellow wrangler 

Wright was accompanied by fellow  Australian crocodile wrangler Chris Wilson, who has been working with local conservation agency and struggled for years to rescue the crocodile. It came to light last month after a competition was called on offering persons an unspecified financial reward for any individual who captures the 13-foot crocodile. The officials reportedly called off the contest later and said that it would redouble efforts to free the crocodile from the tyre which the conservationists feared could endanger the croc's safety. Wilson said that thousands of enthusiast spectators have turned up to watch the rescue efforts.

READ: Rare Fossil Of Bone-crushing Reptile Related To Modern Crocodiles Found In Brazil

Video sparked worries

A video had also surfaced on the internet where the reptile can be seen gasping for air. The video had sparked worries that the tyre was choking the reptile to death. After the most recent sighting of the crocodile, the governor of the province instructed his resource-strapped conservation agency to figure a way out that puts an end to years of failure. Hence, the idea of the contest was born. Previously, the agency had offered few details on the reward, or how some outsiders could pull off the task. The agency's chief has reportedly said that cash for the rescuer will come out of his own pocket. He also issued a warning that they were not calling on amateurs to hunt down the reptile, but are looking for people with a background in wildlife rescue and a sense of conservation.
READ: WATCH: Hungry Leopard Steals Food From The Jaws Of A Huge Crocodile

READ: Australian Man Rescued Alive, Weeks After Missing In Crocodile Infested Forest

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