Australian Scientists Write Open Letter To Govt, Urge To Reduce Gas Emissions

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Australian scientists have written to their government to take urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions after the country was devastated by bushfires.

Written By Vishal Tiwari | Mumbai | Updated On:
Australia

Australian scientists have written to their government to take urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions after the country was devastated by recent bushfires. As per media reports, more than 270 scientists have written and signed an open letter to their government to take action and urged politicians across party lines to work together and respond to the climate emergency. 

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The open letter

In the open letter, the scientists stated, "Our current laws are failing because they are too weak, have inadequate review and approval processes, and are not overseen by an effective compliance regime. Since they were established (in 1999), 7.7m hectares of threatened species habitat has been destroyed. That’s an area larger than Tasmania. Meanwhile, the number of extinctions continue to climb, while new threats emerge and spread unchecked."

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The letter further stated, "We need a clear, non-partisan path to reduce Australia’s total greenhouse gas emissions in line with what the scientific evidence demands, and the commitment from our leaders to push for meaningful global action to combat climate change."

Australian Parliament resumed for the first time since the deadly wildfire ravaged Australia in September and scientists expect that the parliamentarians will discuss the crisis and respond accordingly. 

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Fires across southern Australia have claimed at least 33 lives and destroyed more than 3,000 homes and razed more than 10.6 million hectares (26.2 million acres). Australia had been gripped by ravaging bushfire since September last year and the damage has been so dreadful that it is being dubbed as the worst in recorded history.

According to Steven Selwood of South Australia Veterinary Emergency Management, there are only 9,000 koalas remaining out of the 46,000 that were thought to be on the island before this year's bushfire. The bushfire this season is seemingly unprecedented as an estimated 480 million animals and 1,000 homes have been affected by the inferno.

Read: Sachin Tendulkar Responds With Class To Ricky Ponting's Tweet On Australia Bushfires Match
 

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